Menu
Menu
Find a Doctor
SBK Shows Advantage over Traditional LASIK

SBK Shows Advantage over Traditional LASIK

updated

If you're considering refractive vision correction surgery, you have undoubtedly heard of LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis). Before you decide on a procedure, you should learn about SBK (sub-Bowman's keratomileusis), the latest advance in LASIK-type surgery.

The advantage of SBK is that it requires less tissue disruption than traditional LASIK, reducing the likelihood of dry eye, the most common side-effect of LASIK.

The difference is the use of the femtosecond laser to cut the corneal flap that exposes the inner layers of the cornea for laser shaping. The result is a flap only about 110 microns thick, just enough to include Bowman's membrane, a thin non-cellular layer of the cornea immediately below the outer epithelium Other cutting techniques usually result in a flap 120 to 160 microns thick, thus including some of the inner tissue.

The likelihood of developing dry eye after surgery is partially dependent on the thickness of the inner corneal tissue available for laser reshaping. The thinner flap achieved with SBK leaves more tissue, enhancing the potential for a better result and a significantly reduced chance of dry eye.

Although it is showing impressive results, SBK may not be appropriate for every patient. You should consult an experienced refractive vision correction surgeon to learn if it's right for you.

Want More Information?

Contact a Doctor Near You.